Phone us: +49 2224 123-9332
Email us: info@breitbach.com
International Executive Search - Internationale Personalberatung - Reclutamiento Internacional

Executive Search Firm Latvia

Welcome to Robert Breitbach Consulting

Since 1993, Robert Breitbach Consulting has been present on the market as a retained International Executive Search Firm with a focus on technical industries.

With offices in Germany, Spain and Estonia as well as a partner network throughout Europe, the United States, the Middle East and Asia, that has been built over a period of two decades, we have all the necessary resources to manage your domestic and international personnel recruiting projects.

Please click here for our brochure and a non-binding quotation


Phone: +49 2224 123-9332 ☯ Email: info@breitbach.com

Our business activities include all tools a search firm can access, such as direct search, social networks, classifieds, database and last but not least our valuable industry contacts - after all we have 25 years of experience!

Do not hesitate to contact us. We would like to inform you about our recruitment process in detail and it goes without saying that we would be pleased to provide you with references.



About Us

Since 1993, our consulting company has been specializing in the following fields:


Recruitment


The identification and recommendation
of prospective employees.

Succession Planning


Corporate succession.
Transfer of business.

Outplacement


Situation analysis, negotiations.
Social adaption concepts.



About Us

We view all people in our field as partners. It is our goal to treat others as we would like to be treated ourselves.

Our behavior is a result of our reliability, civility and friendliness. We see this as the only path to creating a lasting relationship with our partners.

Contact of potential candidates is strictly forbidden among our customers.

Through our high standards and professionalism, we have the ability to maintain long-term relationships with our partners.

In respect to the sensibility of our activities, we adhere to strict confidentiality regarding all matters.



Facts About Latvia And Latvia's Economy

Latvia, officially known as the Republic of Latvia, is a country in the Baltic region of Northern Europe. Since its independence, Latvia has been referred to as one of the Baltic states. It is bordered by Estonia to the north, Lithuania to the south, Russia to the east, and Belarus to the southeast, and shares a maritime border with Sweden to the west. Latvia has 1,957,200 inhabitants. and a territory of 64,589 km2 (24,938 sq. mi).

After centuries of Swedish, Polish and Russian rule, a rule mainly executed by the Baltic German aristocracy, the Republic of Latvia was established on 18 November 1918 when it broke away and declared independence in the aftermath of World War I. However, by the 1930s the country became increasingly autocratic after the coup in 1934 establishing an authoritarian regime under Kārlis Ulmanis. The country's de facto independence was interrupted at the outset of World War II, beginning with Latvia's forcible incorporation into the Soviet Union, followed by the invasion and occupation by Nazi Germany in 1941, and the re-occupation by the Soviets in 1944 (Courland Pocket in 1945) to form the Latvian SSR for the next 45 years.

The peaceful Singing Revolution, starting in 1987, called for Baltic emancipation from Soviet rule and condemning the Communist regime's illegal takeover. It ended with the Declaration on the Restoration of Independence of the Republic of Latvia on 4 May 1990, and restoring de facto independence on 21 August 1991. Latvia is a democratic sovereign state, parliamentary republic and a very highly developed country according to the United Nations Human Development Index. Its capital Riga served as the European Capital of Culture in 2014. Latvian is the official language. Latvia is a unitary state, divided into 119 administrative divisions, of which 110 are municipalities and nine are cities. Latvians and Livonians are the indigenous people of Latvia. Latvian and Lithuanian are the only two surviving Baltic languages.

Despite foreign rule from the 13th to 20th centuries, the Latvian nation maintained its identity throughout the generations via the language and musical traditions. However, as a consequence of centuries of Russian rule (1710–1918) and later Soviet occupation, 26.9% of Latvians are ethnic Russians, some of whom (14.1% of Latvian residents) have not gained citizenship, leaving them with no citizenship at all. Until World War II, Latvia also had significant minorities of ethnic Germans and Jews. Latvia is historically predominantly Lutheran Protestant, except for the Latgale region in the southeast, which has historically been predominantly Roman Catholic. The Russian population are largely Eastern Orthodox Christians.

Latvia is a high-income advanced economy and ranks 41st in the Human Development Index. It performs favorably in measurements of civil liberties, press freedom, internet freedom, democratic governance, living standards and peacefulness. Latvia is a member of the European Union, Eurozone, NATO, the Council of Europe, the United Nations, CBSS, the IMF, NB8, NIB, OECD, OSCE, and WTO. A full member of the Eurozone, it began using the euro as its currency on 1 January 2014, replacing the Latvian lats.

Latvia is a member of the World Trade Organization (1999) and the European Union (2004). On 1 January 2014, the Euro became the country's currency, superseding the Lats. According to statistics in late 2013, 45% of the population supported the introduction of the euro, while 52% opposed it. Following the introduction of the Euro, Eurobarometer surveys in January 2014 showed support for the Euro to be around 53%, close to the European average.

Since the year 2000, Latvia has had one of the highest (GDP) growth rates in Europe. However, the chiefly consumption-driven growth in Latvia resulted in the collapse of Latvian GDP in late 2008 and early 2009, exacerbated by the global economic crisis, shortage of credit and huge money resources used for the bailout of Parex bank. The Latvian economy fell 18% in the first three months of 2009, the biggest fall in the European Union.

The economic crisis of 2009 proved earlier assumptions that the fast-growing economy was heading for implosion of the economic bubble, because it was driven mainly by growth of domestic consumption, financed by a serious increase of private debt, as well as a negative foreign trade balance. The prices of real estate, which were at some points growing by approximately 5% a month, were long perceived to be too high for the economy, which mainly produces low-value goods and raw materials.

Privatization in Latvia is almost complete. Virtually all previously state-owned small and medium companies have been privatized, leaving only a small number of politically sensitive large state companies. The private sector accounted for nearly 68% of the country's GDP in 2000.

Foreign investment in Latvia is still modest compared with the levels in north-central Europe. A law expanding the scope for selling land, including to foreigners, was passed in 1997. Representing 10.2% of Latvia's total foreign direct investment, American companies invested $127 million in 1999. In the same year, the United States of America exported $58.2 million of goods and services to Latvia and imported $87.9 million. Eager to join Western economic institutions like the World Trade Organization, OECD, and the European Union, Latvia signed a Europe Agreement with the EU in 1995 - with a four year transition period. Latvia and the United States have signed treaties on investment, trade, and intellectual property protection and avoidance of double taxation.

In 2010 Latvia launched a Residence by Investment program (Golden Visa) in order to attract foreign investors and make local economy benefit from it. This program allows investors to get Latvia residence permit by investing at least €250,000 in property or in an enterprise with at least 50 employees and an annual turnover of at least €10M. Residency is guaranteed only to those buying buildings or developed land. Since the start of the scheme in 2010, foreigners have invested almost €2 billion into Latvia's economy.

To read full article on Wikipedia, please click on this link: Latvia

(Source and References: Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia)



Address

Robert Breitbach Consulting
Sakala tn 7-2
10141 Tallinn, Estonia

Contact

Phone: +49 2224 123-9332
Fax: +49 2224 93 78 78
Email: info@breitbach.com

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